The number of non-family households across the U.S. has increased threefold since 1940. The change has been slow and gradual, with each year witnessing an increase in the number of non-family households. The Census Bureau defines non-family households as households in which an individual or unrelated individuals reside together. vHomeInsurance analyzed the dataset available with the Census Bureau to understand the increasing trend of non-family households and the factors that facilitate the increase of non-family households

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The percentage of non-family households has remained the same in the year 2019 from 2018. The analysis of historical data revealed that there was no sudden surge in the number of non-family households at any point since 1940. The increase was rather steady, without dipping at any point. The percentage of non-family households grew by 16 percent in the last decade. At present, the number of non-family households stands at 45,096,000.

Out of the total number of non-family households, female-owned and rented households account for the majority, with 23,515,000 households, while male-owned and rented households account for 21,582,000 households. The number of non-family female householders have outpaced the number of non-family male householders. The year 2013 witnessed the number of non-family female householders surpass the number of non-family male householders for the first time in history.

While the percentage of family households has always outweighed that of non-family households, the last decade witnessed non-family households growing at double the rate of family households. The steady increase in the number of non-family households has largely been attributed to the aging population and cultural shift. When one partner passes away, the other partner winds up alone, which makes him/her a non-family householder. Additionally, the prevalent culture of couples living together without getting married has also lead to an increase in non-family households. Moreover, the economic situation also drives young adults to move in together, as it becomes difficult for them to afford a place individually.